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Cranberries could allay cancer threat


April 1, 2008
By Fruit & Vegetable

Topics

If the cancer-inhibiting
properties of red wine don’t tempt you, why not try a cosmopolitan, the
cranberry-based cocktail made famous by the Sex and the City girls.

If the cancer-inhibiting properties of red wine don’t tempt you, why not try a cosmopolitan, the cranberry-based cocktail made famous by the Sex and the City girls.

Scientists have discovered a new compound in cranberries that works in a completely new way to prevent metastasis, the spread of cancer to other parts of the body.

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Catherine Neto, from the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, discovered the compound, which prevents cancer cells from breaking away from the primary site and spreading to other parts of the body, a process called metastasis. It inhibits the molecular scissors on the cell surface that snip away at the anchors holding cancer cells in place.

The cranberry compound inhibits the growth of human lung, colon and leukemia cells in culture, but does not affect healthy cells. These findings are published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.