United States
John Bowman (Ph.D. Plant Pathology ’84) recently received the “Outstanding International Horticulturalist” award from the American Society of Horticultural Science. This award recognized Bowman’s lifetime of achievement in international horticulture. He currently serves as a program area leader in the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Office of Agricultural Research and Policy.
Published in News
It may surprise you to learn that wild potatoes grow like weeds in South America. While farmers in the United States battle weeds like pigweed and lamb’s quarters, farmers in the Andes Mountains have to keep weedy potatoes in check.
Published in Vegetables
During vineyard development, Central Coast grape growers often feel compelled to leave an old iconic oak standing, even if it ends up right in the middle of their vineyard. While driving through the Central Coast, it’s not unusual to see the pattern of vineyard rows broken by a majestic oak tree. Aside from their beauty, what are some of the ecosystem services that these majestic trees provide?
Published in Fruit
A Florida State University researcher is examining how the polyphenol compounds found in blackberries could be used to help fight the buildup of artery plaque.
Published in Research
UC Cooperative Extension, Beckstoffer Vineyards and Duarte Nursery are launching the wine industry’s most ambitious cabernet sauvignon rootstock and clone trial in the Red Hills of Lake County to give the varietal greater resilience to climate change.
Published in Research
Not eating your fruits and vegetables can have serious health consequences, from obesity to macular degeneration. And many Americans, even those who have easy access to these healthy foods, stubbornly resist eating them.
Published in Research
Last May, a Turlock almond grower noticed nearly all the nuts on a row of trees in his orchard had fallen to the ground.
Published in Insects
Bee Vectoring Technologies International Inc. recently announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved Clonostachys rosea CR-7 (CR-7) for use as a fungicide on commercial crops.
Published in Companies
Farmers have had long-running battles trying to keep birds of many varieties from eating their sweetcorn. They’ve used propane cannons, visual deterrents and even shotguns, but none succeed for very long.
Published in Safety
Soil organic matter has long been known to benefit farmers. The carbon in this organic matter acts as a food source for soil microbes, which then provide other nutrients to the crops grown. Microbes, insects and small soil critters produce materials that can improve soil structure and water retention. It’s a healthy ecosystem every farmer wants to encourage.
Published in Organic production
A hot plant is an early warning sign of an under-watered, unhealthy plant, which makes monitoring crop temperatures a priority for many farmers. But to do so, they need the right equipment. Infrared cameras can detect heat and convert it into an image, but they are large, unwieldy and expensive. Infrared sensors are less expensive, but they don’t provide images, which makes accurate monitoring difficult for medium and large-sized fields.
Published in Irrigating
Products we commonly buy at the supermarket, such as tortillas and corn chips, are made from food grade corn. The corn is grown, harvested, bought by a food company, turned into masa (dough from ground corn) through a chemical process, and then made into our favorite products.
Published in Research
The Public Strawberry Breeding Program at the University of California, Davis, has released five new varieties that will help farmers manage diseases, control costs and produce plenty of large, robust berries using less water, fertilizer and pesticides. Two of the new varieties could increase yields by almost 30 per cent.
Published in Fruit
AgroFresh Solutions, Inc., a global leader in produce freshness solutions, recently announced a focused effort to formalize and strengthen its decades-long commitment to sustainability.
Published in Companies
Today, Martin Burwash laughs at the irony and wishes now he was a little more serious in his studies after seeing the role Spanish has played in his career as a life-long farmer.
Published in Research
Growers sizing up the impacts a changing climate could have on North America are well aware of two key challenges. One is greater rainfall earlier in the winter, meaning smaller snow packs and less runoff during the growing season. This will contribute to drier summers. Compounding the effects of a drier growing season is a rise in temperatures.
Published in Irrigating
Until recently, New York onion farmers had just two insecticide options for controlling onion thrips, a pervasive insect pest, and neither was good. One was short-lived, the other was dangerous to work with – and both were losing effectiveness.
Published in Vegetables
Through the months of February and March, Top Crop Manager, Fruit and Vegetable, Canadian Poultry, Manure Manager and Potatoes in Canada – the agricultural magazines published by parent company Annex Business Media – polled their readers to find out their opinions on their succession plans and the future of farming in Canada.
Published in News
The United States Department of Agriculture, through the National Organic Program, has recently launched the Organic Integrity Learning Center in an effort to support the ongoing development of personnel working in organic certification and compliance and enforcement roles.
Published in News
Pollinator gardens are most beneficial to pollinators when they contain a greater variety of plants, according to research from the University of Georgia.
Published in Research
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