United States
Growers sizing up the impacts a changing climate could have on North America are well aware of two key challenges. One is greater rainfall earlier in the winter, meaning smaller snow packs and less runoff during the growing season. This will contribute to drier summers. Compounding the effects of a drier growing season is a rise in temperatures.
Published in Irrigating
Until recently, New York onion farmers had just two insecticide options for controlling onion thrips, a pervasive insect pest, and neither was good. One was short-lived, the other was dangerous to work with – and both were losing effectiveness.
Published in Vegetables
Through the months of February and March, Top Crop Manager, Fruit and Vegetable, Canadian Poultry, Manure Manager and Potatoes in Canada – the agricultural magazines published by parent company Annex Business Media – polled their readers to find out their opinions on their succession plans and the future of farming in Canada.
Published in News
The United States Department of Agriculture, through the National Organic Program, has recently launched the Organic Integrity Learning Center in an effort to support the ongoing development of personnel working in organic certification and compliance and enforcement roles.
Published in News
Pollinator gardens are most beneficial to pollinators when they contain a greater variety of plants, according to research from the University of Georgia.
Published in Research
The Organic Trade Association’s export promotion program closed the first quarter of 2019 with a flourish, and is beginning the second quarter in an equally robust way.
Published in Organic production
In these times of higher minimum wage and other input costs, it’s critical to make sure labour efficiency is as high as possible.
Published in Research
“Samurai Wasps vs. Stink Bugs” is not the title of the latest Avengers film. But it does describe new efforts by Cornell scientists to control a household nuisance and agricultural pest.
Published in Insects
There’s a lot that’s been proven good about whole orchard recycling, putting those almond trees back into the soil where they stood. And there’s plenty to indicate that drawbacks from the practice can be addressed.
Published in Fruit
A 26-episode weekly video series on YouTube to help train the next generation of vegetable crop workers and increase their use of effective stewardship practices in vegetable production.
Published in News
As the grape growing season gets underway, Michelle Moyer, a WSU associate professor and extension specialist, is leading a diverse and multi-disciplined team to address the challenge of fungicide resistant, powdery mildew.
Published in News
For the first time, the University of California has hired a Cooperative Extension specialist dedicated to organic agriculture.
Published in News
Spitting out watermelon seeds can be a summertime rite of passage for some folks. Others like their watermelons seedless. How did those seedless watermelons (and other plants) come about? 
Published in Research
The new Great Lakes and Maritimes Pest Monitoring Network will include trap monitoring for western bean cutworm (WBC), European corn borer (ECB), corn earworm (CEW), black cutworm (BCW), true armyworm (TAW) and fall armyworm (FAW). Crops currently include field corn, sweet corn, dry beans and snap beans. If this works, more pests and crops can be added in the future.
Published in Vegetables
ECOCERT and Soil Association Certification, the leading French and U.K. organic certification bodies, have announced a formal partnership.
Published in Organic production
New apple varieties have been popping up for years in hopes of becoming the next Ambrosia. But, how do new varieties gain traction in the market? And, how much of their success depends on consumer preference?  
Published in Marketing
The National Corn Growers Association – in partnership with the Honey Bee Health Coalition – is releasing new best management practices (BMPs) to protect bees and other pollinators in and around cornfields.
Published in Associations
The beloved peanut usually grows in sandy soil where there might not be much moisture. But some varieties of peanut perform better in drought than others. They use less water when there isn’t much to go around, and remain productive as drought deepens. Crop scientists are trying to find the peanut varieties best at it.
Published in Research
The start of a new year is something I tend to look forward to. There is nothing more promising than an untouched calendar with blank days just waiting to be filled with the highs and lows of what is sure to be another eventful chapter.
Published in Profiles
During the month of October, as part of its Sakata Gives Corporate Giving Program, Sakata Seed America, a world leader in breeding and producing vegetable and flower seed, participated in two walks, including a special Sakata co-ordinated campus walk, to raise awareness and much-needed funds for the American Heart Association.
Published in News
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