Specialty Research
Canada Organic Trade Association’s latest report shows continued growth of Prairie organic acreage and operations in 2018. 
Published in News
From the equator to the arctic, life forms have adapted to their particular climate and regional conditions. In steamy sub-tropical estuaries, mangrove forests dominate the landscape. They bridge the salt- and fresh-water worlds. In northern Canada and Russia, the evergreen trees of the taiga forest endure incredibly cold winters and long periods of almost complete darkness. These differences are visible to us living on the earth’s surface. But what about the tiny life within the soil? Can the millions of microbes in a single teaspoonful of soil be as specialized as the trees they live beneath?
Published in Organic production
Products we commonly buy at the supermarket, such as tortillas and corn chips, are made from food grade corn. The corn is grown, harvested, bought by a food company, turned into masa (dough from ground corn) through a chemical process, and then made into our favorite products.
Published in Research
British Columbia's agritech companies are partnering with the federal and provincial governments to find the perfect pairing between food and technology.
Published in Provinces
Food Secure Canada led a research project to better understand how consumers living with low-incomes value and access sustainably grown foods, what barriers they face in doing so and what policy measures could be undertaken to facilitate greater access.
Published in Research
A standing army at the ready – that’s what is now possible for Canadian growers to help them protect their crops thanks to recent work done by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) research scientist Roselyne Labbé.
Published in Organic production
Eating a cup of blueberries a day reduces risk factors for cardiovascular disease - according to new research led by the University of East Anglia, in collaboration with colleagues from Harvard and across the U.K.
Published in Research
Pollinator gardens are most beneficial to pollinators when they contain a greater variety of plants, according to research from the University of Georgia.
Published in Research
In these times of higher minimum wage and other input costs, it’s critical to make sure labour efficiency is as high as possible.
Published in Research
“Samurai Wasps vs. Stink Bugs” is not the title of the latest Avengers film. But it does describe new efforts by Cornell scientists to control a household nuisance and agricultural pest.
Published in Insects
As the grape growing season gets underway, Michelle Moyer, a WSU associate professor and extension specialist, is leading a diverse and multi-disciplined team to address the challenge of fungicide resistant, powdery mildew.
Published in News
According to the latest study conducted by the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture FiBL and IFOAM - Organics International, the Canadian organic sector continues to register significant growth despite the fact that the overall agricultural land base remains stable and non-organic agricultural operations are in slope. Now there are more than 6,000 certified organic operations, almost 4,800 certified organic producers and 1.27 million certified organic hectares (including wild collection).
Published in Organic production
For the first time, the University of California has hired a Cooperative Extension specialist dedicated to organic agriculture.
Published in News
Average farmland value in Canada continued its steady climb in 2018, driven by fewer, but more strategic investments by producers.
Published in Provinces
FarmFolk CityFolk, a not for profit society based in B.C. that works to cultivate a local, sustainable food system, has signed a lease on 3-1/2 acres of land to operate a new research and education seed farm.
Published in Organic production
The University of Guelph Ridgetown Campus recently released a number of new tables outlining fungicide efficacy for management of diseases in field tomatoes. 
Published in Diseases
The beloved peanut usually grows in sandy soil where there might not be much moisture. But some varieties of peanut perform better in drought than others. They use less water when there isn’t much to go around, and remain productive as drought deepens. Crop scientists are trying to find the peanut varieties best at it.
Published in Research
The new Canada Food Guide recommends filling half your plate with them as part of a plant-based diet, but research from the University of B.C. shows some are moving in the wrong direction.
Published in News
The University of Guelph is conducting a survey to gather information on how and why farmers may use blockchains on the farm. Your participation is very valuable to the university and is greatly appreciated.
Published in News
Every day there is a new smartphone application launched that claims to assist growers in their farming efforts. And while many of these apps can be beneficial tools, wading through the ever-growing lineup of offerings can be a daunting task.
Published in Equipment
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