Business/Policy
FMC is pleased to announce that Darren Dillenbeck has joined the company as Canada country manager.

Dillenbeck will lead the Canadian organization and report directly to Amy O'Shea, FMC vice president and business director for Agricultural Solutions, North America.

O'Shea expects that Dillenbeck's comprehensive marketing and sales experience will be a major asset, as FMC enters a new chapter in the Canadian marketplace with a wide-ranging product portfolio strengthened by the acquisition of select crop protection assets from DuPont in 2017.

"Darren is joining FMC at a very exciting time," says O'Shea. "His key responsibilities include exploring the unique market opportunities our broader portfolio affords us and working in collaboration with the Canadian team to grow and evolve our market presence and channel partner strategy."

Dillenbeck notes that FMC will be a "pure-play" agriculture company focused solely on bringing unique crop protection options and value to Canadian farmers.

"We want to build a business platform that makes it easier for our customers to work with us," he says. "With world class research and development, in addition to a strong team, I believe that FMC is well-poised to deliver local solutions that serve our customers' needs."

Dillenbeck brings more than 20 years of agriculture industry experience to FMC, having held various commercial leadership roles with Dow AgroSciences. Dillenbeck also helped launch new business segments in Canadian agriculture with the introduction of technology, formulations and product combinations.
Published in Companies
The Canadian Agri-Business Education Foundation (CABEF) is proud to announce the winners of their annual scholarships. Each of these exceptional students will receive $2,500 for post-secondary agricultural education.

The 2018 winners are:
  • Adriana Van Tryp, Burdett, Alta.
  • Laura Carruthers, Frenchman Butte, Sask.
  • Pete Giesbrecht, Winkler, Man.
  • Owen Ricker, Dunnville, Ont.
  • Jeremy Chevalley, Moose Creek Ont.
  • Émilie Carrier, Princeville, Que.
  • Justin Kampman, Abbotsford, B.C.
Each year, CABEF awards scholarships of $2,500 to Canadian students entering their first year at an accredited agriculture college or university. CABEF is a charity foundation that encourages students to pursue their passion for agriculture and to bring their new ideas and talent to the industry.

Scholarship winners are evaluated on a combination of leadership attributes, academic standing and their response to the essay question, "What do you consider to be the three main opportunities for the Canadian agriculture industry and which one inspires you the most?"

“We are proud to support the future of the Canadian agriculture industry by providing these scholarships,” said Jenn Norrie, chair of the board for CABEF. “With the high-quality applications received from students across the country, the future of Canadian agriculture is bright.”

For further information about CABEF’s work, visit cabef.org.
Published in Provinces
The Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently announced the approval of minor use label expansion registrations for Entrust and Success insecticides for control of cabbage maggot on Brassica leafy greens crop subgroup 4-13B and Brassica head and stem vegetables, crop group 5-13 in Canada.

Entrust and Success insecticides were already labeled for use on a wide variety of crops in Canada for control of several insects.

These minor use projects were submitted by Quebec as a result of minor use priorities established by growers and extension personnel. | READ MORE
Published in Insects
The North American Farmers’ Direct Marketing Association Inc. (NAFDMA) has announced the selection of Corey Connors as its new executive director.

This appointment comes after Charlie Touchette, who provided NAFDMA with association management services for nearly 20 years, formally concluded his tenure effective May 1, 2018. The selection of Connors was made after an extensive national search overseen by the NAFDMA Board of Directors. “We are thrilled to formally announce Corey’s appointment,” said Tom Tweite, President of NAFDMA.

Connors joins NAFDMA with over 17 years of leadership experience in the agriculture, retail and attractions industries. Most recently, he served as chief staff executive of the North Carolina Nursery & Landscape Association (NCNLA).

Prior to NCNLA, he served in advocacy roles for several prominent national and international trade groups including the Society of American Florists (SAF), the American Nursery & Landscape Association (ANLA) and the International Association of Amusement Parks & Attractions (IAAPA). Connors holds a Master of Arts in Political Management from the George Washington University and Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Clarion University.

“It is a genuine privilege and honor to serve this dynamic, growing industry,” said Connors. “Agritourism and farm direct marketing provide an unparalleled opportunity for consumers to reconnect to the family farm, creating unique experiences and rare opportunities to make precious memories.” He continued, “Our charge is clear: NAFDMA must provide cutting-edge tools and resources that support our community of innovators who seek to grow farm profitability while providing immeasurable benefits to their hometown.”

Connors begins his tenure at NAFDMA under a new operating structure, with the organization previously hiring on two additional direct employees last fall. This positions the association to have a stronger pulse on industry trends and will provide the opportunity to launch new member-focused programs and services. The first employees hired by NAFDMA include Membership Development and Services Manager, Lisa Dean and Education and Operations Manager, Jeff Winston.

“Interacting with motivated farm operators and entrepreneurs is rewarding. It is truly my pleasure to service our members,” said Dean.

“Having worked for this industry over the past five years, I’m excited to elevate the educational offerings that NAFDMA provides to each of its members,” said Winston.
Published in Associations
The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) recently released a report that details the important contribution rural municipalities make and outlines the unique challenges they face.

The comprehensive report titled Rural Challenges, national opportunity – Shaping the future of rural Canada includes recommendations encouraging the federal government to tackle these challenges head-on and raise Canadians’ quality of life nationwide.

“When it comes to providing the infrastructure necessary to support a strong economy and high quality of life, rural governments are faced with two key problems—the challenge of serving dispersed communities and the limits of their fiscal and administrative capacity,” said FCM’s rural forum chair, Ray Orb.

The report provides recommendations to address the realities rural municipalities face. Key recommendations of this report include:
  • Applying a ‘rural lens’ to all federal policies and programs aimed at empowering smaller communities to better support local needs
  • Designing future rural infrastructure programs that provide long-term predictable funding with flexibility to account for rural realities
  • Committing long-term predictable resources to expanding broadband internet access in rural, northern and remote communities
“This report tells the story of the significant contribution rural municipalities make to the nation’s economy, but it also highlights the fiscal squeeze they face due to low population densities and the exodus of younger generations,” added Orb. “But as a key driver of economic growth, we know that investing in rural Canada means building a better country for everyone.”

FCM is leading the way in advocating for new tools that empower rural communities to build tomorrow’s Canada and has secured unprecedented federal investment in recent years. The full report is available here.

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities is the national voice of municipal governments, with nearly 2,000 members representing more than 90 per cent of the Canadian population.
Published in Associations
The Canadian Horticultural Council presented before the Standing Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry (AGFO) to discuss Part 5, as it relates to farming, of Bill C-74 (a bill intended to pass into law certain elements of Budget 2018).

Key points conveyed
CHC took advantage of its appearance before the senate committee to reiterate its key messages regarding carbon pricing, notably:
  • The government should recognize that greenhouse vegetable growers deliberately create, capture and assimilate CO2 for crop fertilization.
  • The government should issue a national exemption from its carbon pricing policy to cover all fuel used for agricultural activities, including greenhouses, thereby minimizing the impacts of interprovincial competitiveness.
  • The government should create a national relief mechanism, as the current carbon tax creates a competitive disadvantage between growers within a single province, across Canada, and on the international stage.
  • The government should use CHC’s revised definition of primary agriculture across all departments and in Bill C-74, as the current definition does not reflect the full range of farming activities and machinery used in Canadian primary agriculture (see suggested definition below).
  • Many greenhouse growers invest their own money into adapting and implementing new energy efficiencies, even before government funding becomes available. The Senators discussed with CHC the opportunity for these efforts to be recognised financially, retroactively.
  • Carbon pricing cannot simply be passed onto consumers due to the global nature of the produce market.
CHC will be following up directly with the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance regarding Bill C-74 to emphasize our main asks.
Published in Federal
A new presentation on Canada-U.S. regulatory initiatives is now available on the CanadaGAP website to explain how CanadaGAP certification fits with recent regulatory initiatives in Canada and the U.S.

The Safe Food for Canadians Regulations (SFCR) are expected to be published in spring/summer 2018. The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) has already come into force in the U.S.

The presentation puts into context for program participants:
  • How CanadaGAP requirements line up with SFCR requirements
  • How CanadaGAP's Full Government Recognition positions the program as a "model system" to meet regulatory requirements
  • The results of CFIA's assessment of CanadaGAP under its Private Certification Polic and more.
The presentation is now available on the CanadaGAP website at: https://www.canadagap.ca/publications/presentations/

As a reminder, CanadaGAP has also made available various resources to help CanadaGAP-certified companies in or exporting to the United States determine how they will be impacted by the Food Safety Modernization Act. For these resources, visit the Food Safety Linkswebpage: https://www.canadagap.ca/audit-checklist/food-safety-links/, and click on the tab labelled 'FSMA Resources'.

If Canadian program participants are facing pressures from U.S. buyers with respect to the Foreign Supplier Verification Program (FSVP), please let us know. It is important to quantify the extent and impact of the new legislation for the Canadian food safety industry as U.S. regulations are implemented.

If you have any questions or require additional information, send us an email at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or call our office at 613-829-4711.
Published in Food Safety
The butter tart has risen to celebrity status in the last few years. There are butter tart tours, butter tart trails, but if truth be told, I’m not sure what all the fuss is about. I would take a piece of pie over a butter tart any day of the week.
Published in Marketing
Corteva Agriscience, Agriculture Division of DowDuPont, recently announced that the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) in Canada has granted Dow AgroSciences new label registration for Closer Insecticide for the control of Campylomma verbasci (mullein bug) effective immediately.

This announcement is significant as it means Canadian apple growers now have full access to a highly effective product for pest control.

“Closer has always been known for its targeted and quick control of aphids and other orchard pests. With this registration, growers can have even greater confidence in the quality and efficacy of Closer on apples when outbreaks occur as well as for resistance management,” explains Tyler Groeneveld, category leader, Horticulture with Corteva Agriscience.

Closer Insecticide, powered by Isoclast active, is a revolutionary product ideal for control of both resistant and non-resistant pests, delivering the active ingredient sulfoxaflor, which is classified by the Insecticide Resistance Action Committee as the sole member of IRAC Subgroup 4C Sulfoximines.

The active ingredient moves quickly through the plant to deliver excellent systemic and translaminar activity. Pests are controlled both through contact and by ingestion, resulting in fast knockdown and residual control.

Closer is highly selective and has minimal impact on beneficial insects. The properties and overall spectrum of activity of Closer Insecticide makes it an excellent fit for treatment when outbreaks occur as well as part of Integrated Pest Management Programs (IPM) to minimize flare-ups. Further information can be found at: www.corteva.com.
Published in Insects
CanadaGAP is now accepting nominations for candidates to serve on the Board of Directors for CanAgPlus, the corporation that owns and operates the CanadaGAP Program.

CanAgPlus relies on volunteer leaders to guide decision making and oversee management of CanadaGAP. Participation on the Board of Directors affords volunteer leaders the opportunity for personal growth and satisfaction in moving the program forward and improving food safety in the fresh produce industry.

CanAgPlus directors are elected by members (i.e., those who are enrolled in the CanadaGAP Program) at the Annual General Meeting, which will take place in December 2018 in Ottawa, Ontario.

See http://www.canadagap.ca/events/annual-general-meeting/ for further information.

Composition of the Board of Directors
CanAgPlus is currently seeking nominations for four directors to the Board. The Board is comprised of eight directors in total, serving two-year rotating terms to ensure some continuity in membership.

Nominations
A recommended slate of nominees will be prepared in advance of the AGM for circulation to members, and presented for vote at the AGM. In accordance with provisions in the corporate by-law, and subject to applicable rules of order during meetings of members, nominations may also be made by ordinary resolution at the AGM.

Criteria for Directors
Candidates are expected to have a strong interest in the delivery, integrity and objectives of the CanadaGAP Program. Criteria for service on the Board of Directors include:
  • Exhibit ability to communicate interpersonally, provide facilitative leadership, and enforce group discipline on board processes.
  • Strong understanding and experience with the appropriate roles, group processes and corporate bylaws and policies that form systems of corporate governance.
  • Demonstrated judgment and integrity in an oversight role
Consideration will be given to volunteers with experience serving on a not-for-profit Board or governance committee or senior level experience working with other Boards. Experience and skills in the following areas will be considered assets:
  • Good working knowledge of CanadaGAP - its functioning, goals, evolution, etc.
  • Familiarity with administrative and management processes, rather than technical knowledge
  • Personnel management experience
  • Financial management experience
  • Knowledge of international food safety context
Directors need NOT be CanadaGAP program participants.

Term of Office
Directors will serve a two-year term. The Board meets twice a year in person, and holds conference calls as needed.

How to Apply
Those interested in serving on the Board of Directors must complete and submit the application form by August 31, 2018. Self-nominations are acceptable.

General Operating By-law No. 1
The by-law is available for download at: https://www.canadagap.ca/history/members-only/

If you are not a member of CanAgPlus, but interested in serving on the Board, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or call 613-829-4711 to obtain a copy of the by-law.

For more information
Visit www.canadagap.ca for further information about CanadaGAP and its governance.
Published in Food Safety
AgSafe, formerly known as Farm and Ranch Safety and Health Association (FARSHA), is celebrating their 25th anniversary as British Columbia’s agriculture health and safety association.

Established in May of 1993, AgSafe has been the expert on safety in the workplace for B.C.’s agriculture industry and offers site-specific health and safety programs, training, evaluation and consultation services. AgSafe is also a COR program certifying partner and offers a Certificate of Recognition (COR) program for large and small employers.

The organization was established as a joint initiative of WorkSafeBC (Workers’ Compensation Board of British Columbia), the BC Agriculture Council and the Canadian Farmworkers’ Union as B.C.’s experts on workplace safety for the agriculture industry.

Wendy Bennett has been the AgSafe executive director since 2015. “I am really happy to be in this position and celebrating this milestone,” Bennett commented. “I’m proud of AgSafe and the work our team does. Our consultants and advisors work hard to deliver safety information and guidance to hundreds of employers and workers around the province every year, and we’ve seen a significant change over the past twenty-five years with better safety practices for those who work in agriculture.”

Don Dahr, former WorkSafeBC Director of Industry and Labour Services, is the newly elected chair of the AgSafe Board of Directors replacing long-time retiring chair, Ralph McGinn.

“I’ve been involved with, and supported this organization for many years,” says Dahr. “As a non-voting member on the AgSafe Board of Directors for five years my role was to provide guidance on issues affecting agriculture and safety initiatives. Over the years I’ve watched the organization make great strides in developing and offering safety resources and consultation to B.C.’s farmers and ranchers.”

Just over half of B.C.’s agriculture industry employers regularly use services, resources, or information from AgSafe and almost two thirds of agriculture employers have accessed AgSafe resources periodically.

AgSafe’s services are also available to B.C. based landscape trades and professionals, garden centres, wholesale and retail nurseries, suppliers, and tree services.

For more information about AgSafe services or agriculture workplace safety call 1-877-533-1789 or visit www.AgSafeBC.ca.
Published in Associations
Following a corporate rebrand last fall, packaging manufacturer DuPak Inc. recently launched its new website.

While the company launched a temporary site with the unveiling of its new brand late last year, the new website allows customers to explore the plethora of printing and packaging options DuPak has been offering for more than 15 years.

To adequately showcase DuPak’s history, growth and leadership in innovative packaging, the site features details on the brand’s evolution from its humble beginnings, the range of industries served, and the packaging solutions they now provide.

“While we are updating our branding and website, we remain the same company that has served this industry for the past 15 years,” said Duke Yu, CEO of DuPak Inc. “We hope the new site serves as a hub for people looking to learn more about the lastet trends in functional, durable and stylish packaging solutions.”

To experience the new fully branded site, please visit www.dupak.com. For business inquiries, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
Published in Companies
Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) recently released its final decision on the future use of chlorothalonil, a fungicide used in agriculture including fruit and vegetable production.

“Under the authority of the Pest Control Products Act, the PMRA has determined that continued registration of products containing chlorothalonil is acceptable,” the report states.

“An evaluation of available scientific information found that most uses of chlorothalonil products meet current standards for protection of human health or the environment when used according to the conditions of registration, which include required amendments to label directions.”

Even so, some changes have been made to the chlorothalonil label, including cancellation of its use on greenhouse cut flowers, greenhouse pachysandra, and field grown roses (for cut flowers). As well, all chlorothalonil products currently registered as dry flowable or water dispersible granules must be packaged in water-soluble packaging. Buffer zones have also been revised and a vegetative filter strip is required.

You can review the decision and new label requirements by clicking here.
Published in Insects
Ontario’s average farmland values gained steam in 2017 while the Canadian average increase held relatively steady, a sign of a strong and stable agriculture economy, according to J.P. Gervais, chief agricultural economist for Farm Credit Canada (FCC).

The average value of Canadian farmland increased 8.4 per cent in 2017, following a gain of 7.9 per cent in 2016. Although average farmland values have increased every year since 1993, recent increases are less pronounced than the 2011 to 2015 period that recorded significant average farmland value increases in many different regions.

"With the steady climb of farmland values, now is a good time for producers to review and adjust their business plan to reflect variable commodity prices and slightly higher interest rates, assess their overall financial position and focus on increasing productivity,” Gervais said. “It’s also a good idea to have a risk management plan in place to protect your business against unforeseen circumstances and events.”

In Ontario, average farmland values increased by 9.4 per cent in 2017, following gains of 4.4 per cent in 2016 and 6.6 per cent in 2015.

While Saskatchewan, Ontario and Nova Scotia reported the largest average increases, four provinces – British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba and Prince Edward Island saw a smaller increase from the previous year.

Quebec and New Brunswick both showed increases that were fairly close to the national average, while Newfoundland and Labrador didn’t have enough transactions to fully assess farmland values in that province.

Some of last year’s average farmland value increase may also be a result of timing as most provinces recorded a faster pace of increase in the first six months of the year while interest rate increases didn’t occur until the latter half of 2017.

Recent increases in borrowing costs and expectations of further increases could cool the farmland market in 2018, according to Gervais.

FCC’s Farmland Values Report highlights average changes in farmland values – regionally, provincially and nationally. This year’s report describes changes from January 1 to December 31, 2017 and, for the first time, provides a value range in terms of price per acre.

“It’s important to remember that farmland prices can vary widely within regions due to many local factors that can influence how much value a buyer and seller attach to a parcel of land,” Gervais said.

He also stressed that every farm operation is unique and there may be a strong business case for buying more land, but not without carefully weighing the risks and rewards.

“Farm operations need to be cautious in regions where the growth rate of farmland values has exceeded that of farm incomes in recent years,” Gervais said.

“The good news is Canadian farms are generally in a strong financial position when it comes to net cash income and their balance sheets,” he said.

To view the 2017 FCC Farmland Values Report and historical data or register for the free FCC webinar on May 2, visit www.fcc.ca/FarmlandValues. For more information, visit: fcc.ca or follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, and on Twitter @FCCagriculture.
Published in Provinces
As many of you already know, we are expecting several 'new additions' here at Perennia.

Both Rosalie Madden our vegetable specialist and Jennifer Haverstock our small fruit specialist will be leaving us in the coming months for year-long maternity leaves.

To ensure consistent service delivery to our horticultural clients over the coming year, we wanted to inform industry that we have hired Matthew Peill as a general horticulturist based out of the Kentville office.

Matt is currently completing his MSc. in Biology from Acadia University, where his thesis project is on the transmission of strawberry decline disease viruses by the strawberry aphid.

He has been involved in the provincial strawberry aphid and virus monitoring program since 2013 and has had experience with spotted wing drosophila as well. Matt’s experiences as a student with both Perennia and AAFC have given him the opportunity to become familiar with the agricultural industry in the Annapolis Valley.

Matt has the full support of Perennia’s Horticultural Team and Senior Extension Specialists in tackling this significant role, and will benefit from an overlap with both Rosy and Jen, having started April 16th.

For the time being please continue to contact Jen and Rosy; upon their departures calls and emails will be forwarded to Matt at: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it  or 902-300-4710.
Published in Companies
The Agri-Food Management Institute (AMI) will be delivering a mixture of established programming and new projects under the newly launched Canadian Agricultural Partnership.

The focus will be on business management, productivity enhancement and local production opportunities for both farm businesses and food processors.

Popular AMI initiatives, including Advanced Farm Management Program, Transition Smart and the Learning Roadshow, will continue under the new Partnership funding framework.

A Beginner Farmer Entrant Workshop will also be launched this year to complement a new online resource AMI has just unveiled on its website.

New to AMI’s offering will be resources and tools to address productivity-related issues in farm and food processing businesses.

The organization will also be focusing on regional opportunities for value-adding by building connections along the value chain and identifying supply chain gaps in local food production.

AMI promotes new ways of thinking about business management by developing resources, providing information and offering training opportunities for agri-food and agri-based producers and processors. AMI receives funding from the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative.

For more information, visit: www.takeanewapproach.ca
Published in Federal
The Alberta government is taking new steps to raise the profile of local food producers, and supporting the province’s $1-billion local food industry by tabling the Supporting Alberta’s Local Food Sector Act.

The proposed legislation would:
  • Raise the profile of the local food industry
  • Strengthen consumer confidence
  • Identify solutions to challenges facing producers and processors
  • Support sustainable growth in the agriculture and food processing sector

“Alberta has some of the best farmers and food producers in the world. Our government is stepping up to show their support for this industry and the people who put food on our table. This new legislation will help this growing industry find new markets, create new jobs and further diversify the provincial economy," said Oneil Carlier, Minister of Agriculture and Forestry.

The legis`lation would include the establishment of a Local Food Council which would identify options to help address challenges affecting growth in the local food sector.

As well, a new Alberta Local Food Week would be held the third week of August to celebrate and promote local foods. This would tie in with the popular Open Farm Days program that offers Albertans the opportunity to visit local farms to get a better understanding of where their food comes from.

“We support local Alberta producers and the abundant, high-quality agricultural products that are produced in this province. An Alberta local food week will help us raise awareness of amazing Alberta producers and celebrate the innovative, fresh, local foods they produce," said Jason Andersen, president, Alberta Farm Fresh Producers Association.

“This act would ensure that certified organic farmers and processors have a level playing field in Alberta. And consumers will now have trust and confidence that they are getting what they pay for when they buy local organic food," added Charles Newell, president, Organic Alberta.

Under the proposed legislation, the province would also adopt the Canadian Organic Standard for organic foods produced and marketed in Alberta. This would help to improve consumer confidence that foods labelled “organic” are meeting a consistent and nationally recognized standard. Organic regulations will come into effect in 2019.

Government engaged with a wide variety of stakeholders that identified opportunities for the local food industry in the areas of market development, consumer awareness and education, policy and collaboration, access to capital and regulations.

Local food sales from farmers’ markets and through direct-to-consumer channels have more than doubled since 2008 and exceeded $1 billion last year.

Published in Provinces
The 96th Annual General Meeting of the Canadian Horticultural Council took place in Ottawa from March 13 to 15, 2018. By all accounts, the event was a success. More than 150 delegates from all over Canada participated in over 30 standing committee and working group meetings for an update on activities and to discuss issues pertaining to labour, crop protection, industry standards and food safety, business risk management, and trade. Commodity committees also met to discuss issues pertaining to apples, potatoes, berries, field vegetables, and greenhouse vegetables.

Members reviewed, discussed and adopted 21 resolutions that will guide the activities of CHC throughout 2018. The majority of the adopted resolutions pertain to crop protection issues, followed by trade, and then labour issues.

Government participation
The event attracted a significant amount of attention from government, with over 21 federal and provincial government departments and agencies attending. Participants included the following Canadian government departments: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Pest Management Regulatory Agency, Statistics Canada, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Pest Management Centre, and more.

Awards
CHC recognized three special individuals with awards at its 96th Annual Banquet. Rebecca Lee, CHC Executive Director, handed out the Honourary Life Membership Award to Craig Hunter for his 40-plus years of service in the crop protection sector and his longstanding role as technical advisor to CHC’s Crop Protection Advisory Committee. She then presented the Outstanding Achievement Award to Charles Stevens for his dedication and service as a CHC member.

Alvin Keenan, CHC President, then took the stage to present the Doug Connery award to a fellow PEI farmer John MacDonald who has spent more than 40 years in CHC activities, including as president in 1983.

Advocacy Day
For the first year ever, CHC took advantage of its members already being in Ottawa to organize a series of advocacy meetings with government. In just one morning, CHC led 15 meetings with senior department officials and ministerial staff from Agriculture and Agri-Food, Global Affairs, Employment and Social Development, Health, Immigration and Refugee, Environment and Climate Change, and the Prime Minister’s Office, as well as issue-related staff in the offices of parliamentarians. The meetings helped to further our relationships and to reinforce our key positions with senior government officials.
Published in Associations
Canada’s agriculture and food system is a leading producer of high-quality, safe products and a key driver of the country’s economic growth. The Government of Canada understands the importance of this sector in creating good, middle-class jobs, while growing the economy, and is committed to working with farmers, ranchers and processors to ensure its continued innovation, growth and prosperity.

April 1st marked the official launch of the Canadian Agricultural Partnership, a progressive $3-billion commitment that will help chart the course for government investments in the sector over the next five years. The Partnership aims to continue to help the sector grow trade, advance innovation while maintaining and strengthening public confidence in the food system, and increase its diversity.

Federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) governments have been working collaboratively since 2016 to develop the next agricultural policy framework, the Canadian Agricultural Partnership. FPT governments consulted with a wide range of stakeholders, including producers, processors, indigenous communities, women, youth, and small and emerging sectors to ensure the Partnership was focused on the issues that matter most to them.

In addition, under the Partnership, business risk management (BRM) programs will continue to help producers manage significant risks that threaten the viability of their farm and are beyond their capacity to manage.

Ministers of Agriculture will convene in Vancouver this July for the Annual Meeting of Federal,
Provincial and Territorial Ministers of Agriculture.

“I am incredibly proud to announce that the Canadian Agricultural Partnership has officially launched and all that it promises for our great sector. Our goal is to help Canadian farmers, ranchers and processors compete successfully in markets at home and around the globe, through this strong collaboration between provincial, territorial and federal governments," said Minister MacAulay.
Published in Federal
Creating marketing campaigns for your business that also raise awareness for a social injustice or issue has become more and more commonplace in the last few years.
Published in Marketing
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