Fruit & Vegetable Magazine

Features Production Research
Research will examine effect of electrolyzed water on spuds


April 15, 2008
By Fruit & Vegetable

Topics

A Washington potato grower and a
California-based biotechnology company have joined forces to study what
effect electrolyzed water has on potato production and storage.

A Washington potato grower and a California-based biotechnology company have joined forces to study what effect electrolyzed water has on potato production and storage.

Weber Farms, a family-owned farm in eastern Washington state, and Proton Laboratories have agreed to work together in various areas where Proton’s electrolyzed water can be integrated into potato production and post-harvesting processes. It’s hoped use of the water will bring about certain potato maintenance efficacies, environmental and worker safety, on-site production abilities and cost efficiencies.

Advertisment

According to recent research, the electrolysis process can kill bacteria, viruses and other biological contaminants in water and cause organic and inorganic, water-borne contaminants to coagulate and precipitate out of solution, making them easier to remove through filtration. As well, it’s claimed that electrolyzed water has an enhanced ability to carry nutrients and penetrate cellular structures with these nutrients, resulting in accelerated plant growth, improved root development, increased yields and reduced needs for pesticides and fertilizer.

“The management group at Weber Farms is always looking for innovative ways to improve its product and its pre-and-post maintenance processes,” said Bill Weber of Weber Farms.

“Proton’s water may provide those new approaches.” It’s a view shared by Carl Halterman, vice president of Proton Laboratories. “I have studied enough of the applications of Proton’s water in various agricultural processes to realize that a totally innovative approach to some of today’s agricultural concerns may be at work,” he said.

Once suitable results are obtained through small-scale testing, third-party verification of the processes will be obtained.

Weber Farms has a long history of raising and marketing quality potatoes, wheat and corn. In 1979, the operation built a fresh pack potato warehouse to ensure better quality and more oversight of the marketing of open potatoes both to domestic and foreign markets. In 1997, a state-of- the-art potato storage facility capable of storing 50,000 tons was built. End uses of Weber Farm potatoes include boxed and bagged potatoes for retail stores, hash browns, and French fries.