Marketing
August 9, 2017, Edmonton, Alta – The Agri-tourism and Farm Direct Marketing Bus Tour takes place September 11, 2017, in the Spruce Grove/West Yellowhead region.

“The tour will feature family-run businesses doing innovative things on smaller farms in rural Alberta,” says Colin Gosselin, with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry based in Stony Plain. “It will also feature a delicious local food lunch, an artisan winery tour, an experienced agri-tourism coach, and opportunities for networking, sharing, and discussion.”

Stops are at Happy Acres U-Pick, Shady Lane Estate and Leaman Exchange.

Cost for the tour is $25 per person, and includes tour transportation, lunch and refreshments. The bus pick-up and drop-off point will be in the Spruce Grove area. An alternate drop-off point in the Wildwood area is possible.

To register, call 1-800-387-603 by September 6. For more information, contact Colin Gosselin at 780-968-3518.
July 13, 2017, Barrie, Ont. - Sprout Barrie is a 10 week business development program designed to help entrepreneurs take their food ideas from concept to market.

Sprout will provide you with the skills and training you need to develop your food business. The program in comprised of weekly seminars on key business development topics like developing a sales pitch and how to develop your food label.

It also provides significant time in a culinary lab, where you will have access to food product developers who can guide you on the development and scaling up of your food item, using professional culinary equipment. At the end of this 10 week program, you will have a "sale-ready" product formula, a detailed business launch plan and a strong forecast of the profitability of your business.

Sprout is ideal for food entrepreneurs who have an idea and have done some research into their market, target audience, potential product benefit and competitive set. The ideal attendee has also developed their first draft of their business plan and can use this program to fill in the detail. It is also great for those who are currently selling at farmer's markets and festivals, but who want to take their product concept to the next level to target a broader retail audience.

Tell us if this program is a fit for you: 
Georgian College, Agri-Management Food Institute and City of Barrie have been developing a unique educational program for Food Entrepreneurs. Details of the program can be found:http://www.barrie.ca/Doing%20Business/Business-Development/programs/Pages/sprout.aspx

Your input is incredibly important as we want to develop a program that makes sense for you as an entrepreneur who is looking to grow your food business. Please click on the link below to fill the anonymous survey.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/9SJCMGD
July 6, 2017, Quebec - Quebec’s love affair with potatoes shows no sign of fading.

While 10-pound bags are still a big seller, the success of specialty spuds from Edmonton, Alberta-based Little Potato Co. is inspiring the province’s growers to try new varieties and package their own lines.

“Little Potato Co. kits continue to surpass objectives, showing double-digit growth month after month,” said Dino Farrese, executive vice president of Boucherville, Quebec-based product specialist Bellemont Powell.

Farrese said Quebecers love the ease and convenience of not having to peel potatoes and being able to cook them on the barbecue or in the microwave.

“It offers a fresh, quality side that people are going crazy for,” he said.

Gord Medynski, director of sales and purchasing for St. Ubalde, Quebec-based Patates Dolbec, said the company has tripled its acreage of creamer potatoes this year to about 80 acres after three years of successful trials. READ MORE 
July 4, 2017, Regina, Sask. - As Canadians enjoy fresh, local fruit this summer, producers can expect mixed results from the fruits of their labour this fall.

In 2016, Canadian and United States fruit growers increased their production, but didn't necessarily see the demand to match, leading to an oversupply and lower prices for many fruit sectors. As a result, Farm Credit Canada’s (FCC) agriculture economists are predicting a mixed outlook for fruit growers in 2017.

“It’s a balancing act to produce enough fruit to meet demand, but not so much as to cause an oversupply that puts downward pressure on prices,” said J.P. Gervais, FCC chief agricultural economist. “Fortunately, a low Canadian dollar has been supporting prices for Canadian fruit producers and will help offset the full impact of a large supply in some sectors of the industry.”

Gervais added the real benefit will be to the Canadian consumer, who may see lower prices for some fruit – such as apples – at the grocery store.

Wine-making grapes fetch better prices

Grapes that are grown for wine-making in Ontario and British Columbia squeezed out an average three per cent price increase, which helped offset the lower prices for fresh grapes in 2016. Overall, the industry had a good year in 2016, as production increased by 22 per cent from the previous year.

Market prices for grapes are mixed based on the variety, quality and the end use, however, prices currently remain strong for wine grapes as demand is expected to continue growing in 2017.

Increased cranberry yields help offset lower prices

The cranberry industry has had several years of low prices due to growing North American supplies of cranberries.

In Canada, acreage devoted to growing cranberries has remained steady in British Columbia, but has increased in Quebec over the past five years. While prices remain low, rising production and better yields have compensated for low prices, boosting farm cash receipts.

In 2016, Canadian cranberry receipts reached a record $132.6 million, for an increase of 8.8 per cent, an all-time record high. There is also a growing demand for specialized markets segmentation in the cranberry industry, such as organic. Profitability depends on producers’ ability to continually improve their productivity.

Large 2016 harvest pushes apple prices lower

Canadian apple production was up 14 per cent while U.S. apple production increased by four per cent from 2015.

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s monthly apple storage report indicates apple supplies are 98 per cent higher than last year’s level, so a large supply remains a challenge. As a result, Canadian retail apple prices are down 13 per cent in the first quarter of 2017 compared to the same period in 2016, but still remain above the previous five-year average. The same trend has impacted U.S. fresh apple market prices, which are down 12 per cent in 2017 and remain near the previous five-year average.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fruit and Tree Nuts Outlook indicates that 2017 apple prices should remain below 2016 levels given storage numbers. This price pressure is expected to persist until inventories decline.

According to Statistics Canada, in 2015, 31.5 per cent of Canadians aged 12 and older, roughly nine million people, consumed fruit and vegetables five or more times per day.

To celebrate the international fruit day on July 1, Canadians can eat more fruit throughout 2017 knowing their local grocery store will likely be well stocked with delicious and reasonably-priced Canadian fruit this summer and fall.

For an in-depth look at Canada fruit outlook for 2017, visit the FCC Ag Economics blog post at www.fcc.ca/AgEconomics.
June 8, 2017, Brighton, Ont. - Local Food Week is the annual kick-off to the outdoor farmers' market season, when Ontario growers and their just-picked produce return to communities large and small throughout the province.

The growing season is officially underway!

Although the wet spring we've had this year has delayed crops in some areas, others are right on schedule. According to Catherine Clark, the new Executive Director of Farmers' Markets Ontario, "At the majority of markets, you'll find an abundance of spring crops like fresh asparagus and rhubarb, and some farmers have begun harvesting their strawberries."

Other early-season crops to look for at your local farmers' market are the ones that usher in the season for salads: lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, green onions, spinach, peppers, beets, cabbage, new potatoes, parsnips and (possibly) baby carrots. But farmers' markets aren't just about fresh local produce. They're also about homemade jams and jellies, delectable baked goods, fragrant botanicals, honey, maple syrup, gourmet cheese, farm-fresh eggs, locally raised meats and even VQA wines.

Farmers' markets are more than just places to buy fresh local foods.

Food isn't the only reason farmers' markets are so popular in Ontario. Catherine Clark points out that "They bring the city and the country together and get everyone talking about food. They also provide wonderful opportunities for parents to teach their children where the food they eat comes from."

And there's more. Clark adds: "They're also fun places to be. They're friendly, colourful places where friends and neighbours arrange to meet and spend time together. They foster a sense of community wherever they spring up." They're also good for the environment, since locally grown food produces a much smaller carbon footprint than food that is transported long distances to reach our plates.

Farmers' markets are immensely important to the estimated 37,000 families in Ontario that are engaged in local agriculture, providing them with needed income and summer jobs for their children. Many farmers are entitled to identify themselves as MyPick® Verified Local Farmers®. It means that they have been visited and verified by Farmers' Markets Ontario (FMO) as local growers who sell only what they produce on their own local farms. The MyPick® designation sets them apart from vendors masquerading as local growers but who are in fact re-sellers of produce from a variety of sources, often imported and/or purchased at food terminals.

Find out more

You can look up the location and operating hours of all 182 member markets of Farmers' Markets Ontario, as well as find information on MyPick® Verified Local Farmers® on the FMO website at farmersmarketsontario.com.
April 28, 2017, St. Thomas, Ont – Area farmers will have a chance to showcase their new products and get a business case for them, thanks to a new pilot project Fanshawe College is bringing to the community.

The initiative, called the Fanshawe Farm Market project, will match Fanshawe faculty and students in the Agri-Business Management program, offered at the Simcoe/Norfolk campus, with local farmers interested in launching new products to the market, so they can be tested during this year’s farmers’ market season. READ MORE
Pete Luckett is a British-Canadian entrepreneur, media personality plus a dynamic speaker. A native of Nottingham, England, Luckett immigrated to Canada in 1979, settling eventually in Nova Scotia.
If you ask a group of random Canadians about whether they trust farmers and Canada’s food system on the whole, you’ll likely hear a variety of responses.
March 24, 2017, Kentville, NS – Loblaws recently recognized Pazazz apple with its top honour – selection as a President’s Choice product.

President’s Choice status is only bestowed on produce and other food items that demonstrate truly exceptional quality, taste and great value to customers.

Grown locally in Canada by Van Meekeren Farms, Pazazz is a premium winter apple variety and has been in development in conjunction with Honeybear Brands for more than nine years. A descendent of the crowd-pleasing Honeycrisp, Pazazz has a unique blend of sweet and tart flavours and explosive crunch that has attracted a loyal following of customers in just a few short years on the market.

“Each year there are literally hundreds of candidates for President’s Choice status,” says Mark Boudreau, director of corporate affairs for Loblaws Atlantic. “We consider each very carefully for perfect taste, appearance, premium quality and a uniqueness they offer to our Loblaws customers. Pazazz scored highly across the board and was an easy selection for us to make.”

Available now, Pazazz will be sold in 2lb special President’s Choice branded bags in select Loblaws stores while supplies last.

“This is a huge honour and we’re very excited,” says Michael Van Meekeren, co-owner of Van Meekeren Farms. “Pazazz is a young variety compared to many available today and because it’s a winter variety that peaks in flavour in the winter months, it gives apple lovers something that is very difficult to get at this time of year – a premium apple variety with that just-picked freshness.”
 
Pazazz is harvested in late October but reaches the perfect balance of sweet and tart flavours during the winter months, arriving on Loblaws and other retailer shelves in early January each year. This season the variety has shattered all retail goals and expectations.

For more information about Pazazz or Honeybear Brands visit PazazzApple.com or honeybearbrands.com.
Incredible. Unbelievable. Disneyland.
March 21, 2017, Edmonton, Alta – Getting into On-Farm Sales takes place April 4, 2017, at the Agri-Food Business Centre, 6547 Sparrow Drive, Leduc.

“This workshop examines selling your food products direct to consumers from your farm,” says Delores Serafin with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry. “It’s a chance to learn about the different options available to you from u-picks to farm stands and seasonal sales centres. Discover the behind-the-scenes considerations that help to make the consumer experience memorable and your business successful, such as parking and traffic flow, signage, scales, cash handling systems, washrooms, and more.”

Jim Hill with Hidden Valley Garden near Sylvan Lake will talk about the way they implemented a simple sales solution into their u-pick operation, and Vicky Horn with Tangle Ridge Ranch near Thorsby will share how customers access their lamb both on-farm and through off-farm deliveries.

The workshop will also help participants to understand which regulations apply to their business, who to contact and why they matter.

Getting into Farm Sales runs from 9:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. The $25 fee includes GST and covers lunch and refreshments. To register, call 1-800-387-6030 by March 27.
March 1, 2017, Ottawa, Ont – P.E.I. potatoes fetched good prices in 2016, continuing a trend that stretches back to 2004.

The strong performance for Island spuds was shown in the farm product prices indexed released by Statistics Canada Feb. 27. READ MORE
February 20, 2017, Vancouver, BC – In recognition of the importance of the Japanese market, the British Columbia Blueberry Council will again be exhibiting at the country's premier food and beverage trade show, Foodex.

Held from March 7 to 10 in Tokyo, the event attracts influential buyers from across Japan and other Asian markets.

"Japan has long been a very important export market for BC blueberries," said Debbie Etsell, executive director of the BC Blueberry Council. "It's a very discerning market, and the high quality of our fruit is well respected in Japan, both fresh berries in the summer, and frozen and processed formats throughout the year."

In 2016, British Columbia's 800 blueberry growers produced 77 million kilograms of blueberries.

Approximately half of each season's yield is exported to markets outside of Canada, making blueberries the country's most exported fruit. To celebrate this fact, and share Canada's 150th anniversary celebrations at Foodex, representatives of the BCBC will be serving up samples of Blueberry Ginger Pancakes with Maple Syrup – a quintessentially Canadian treat.

As in past years, the council will be exhibiting at Foodex as part of the AgriFood Canada pavilion in the International Zone. The show attracts 77,000 buyers from food service, distribution, and trading companies, with around 3,320 companies exhibiting at the four-day event. Along with offering an excellent opportunity to connect with buyers from the Japan, the show also attracts trade buyers from other Asian markets.

"This is the seventh year that the BC Blueberry Council has attended Foodex, and it's a very important opportunity for us to reconnect with some of the contacts we have made over the years," says Etsell. "We're looking forward to seeing some of the familiar faces from past shows, as well as building some new relationships and connecting them with suppliers that can fulfill their requests, whether they're looking for blueberries in fresh, frozen, dried, powdered, juice or puréed formats."

The BC Blueberry Council works closely with government trade offices at both a provincial and federal level, making the most of opportunities to take part in trade missions, delegations and shows such as Foodex. Other international missions planned for 2017 include Gulfood in Dubai, and Seoul Food & Hotel in Korea.
The long, hot summer days of 2016 helped to create one of the best tomato crops Ontario has seen for a long time. Many farmers were faced with a bumper crop. So what can a farmer do with all those extra tomatoes?
February 6, 2017 – After several years of challenging times, the Canadian processing potato industry is feeling a lift, in part due to a lower loonie.

It’s stimulated exports of French fries and other processed products as well as fresh potatoes to the United States and other markets, and for the first time in years some processing plants in Canada are expanding their production lines. READ MORE
Page 1 of 11

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular

Latest Events

Potato Variety Demonstration
Thu Aug 24, 2017 @ 1:00PM - 03:00PM
International Strawberry Congress 2017
Wed Sep 06, 2017 @ 8:00AM - 05:00PM
Agri-Tourism & Farm Direct Marketing Bus Tour
Mon Sep 11, 2017 @ 8:00AM - 05:00PM