Production

New apple varieties have been popping up for years in hopes of becoming the next Ambrosia. But, how do new varieties gain traction in the market? And, how much of their success depends on consumer preference?  
Farmers are the most innovative people I know. If there is money to be made, they will consider it, try it, personalize it and sell it.
You may have noticed a shift in the last few years from people buying gifts and products, to people who are looking for a special experience for themselves and their families.
The average Canadian family can expect to spend $411 more on food in 2019, bringing their total yearly grocery bill to $12,157 due to more expensive fruit and vegetables, according to Canada’s Food Price Report.
Most on-farm marketers would agree that the seventies were the pinnacle of the pick-your-own (PYO) era. The majority of families at that time had one wage earner and by going to a farm to pick your own fruits and vegetables and preserve them for the winter, families were able to stretch the single salary a little bit further.
According to recent reports from south of the border, two senators from North Dakota are asking their federal government to investigate allegations that Canadian growers are dumping potatoes into the U.S. market. The proof? Over the past few years, there’s been a surge in potato imports from Canada to the U.S. [$212 million worth of fresh potatoes in 2015-2016] while demand for U.S. spuds has decreased. A recent report from Potatoes USA showed exports of fresh U.S. potatoes bound for Canada have dropped 13.5 per cent from July 2017 to June 2018. And U.S. producers believe this is due to Canadian protectionist trade practices and a sign the government is subsidizing the industry. But, according to reports in Canadian media, growers in the Great White North are merely benefiting from a favourable exchange rate. And the only government support they are receiving is through loans that need to be matched 50/50 by the recipient and repaid over 10 years. Senator John Hoeven (Rep) and Senator Heidi Heitkamp (Dem) have both come out strong against Canada, accusing their northern neighbour of “unfair treatment” of American potatoes. “Red River Valley potato growers have a strong case to be made that Canada has unfairly limited their profits and narrowed their fair market access,” Heitkamp said. “Canada remains one of our closest friends and allies, but we still need, and our farmers deserve, reciprocity in trade,” Hoeven said. “That’s why we continue urging the administration to address Canada’s unfair treatment of American agriculture exports. Our trading partners would never tolerate this kind of treatment from the U.S.” This isn’t the only trade woe facing the U.S. potato industry. According to a recent report from Potatoes USA, the U.S. potato market share to Mexico has dropped to 76 per cent from 82 per cent from July 2017 to June 2018 as the European Union and Canada made significant gains in the market.
The Pest Management Research Report (PMRR) is a periodical to facilitate the rapid exchange of information on Integrated Pest management (IPM) among persons involved in research and advisory services on IPM of plant diseases and insect pests in the agri-food sector of Canada.
Fruit and Vegetable magazine is joining with Annex Business Media's other agriculture publications to conduct a survey to gain a better understanding of the future of Canadian farming.
The beloved peanut usually grows in sandy soil where there might not be much moisture. But some varieties of peanut perform better in drought than others. They use less water when there isn’t much to go around, and remain productive as drought deepens. Crop scientists are trying to find the peanut varieties best at it.
Innovations on the farm can come in many forms. From developing a new piece of equipment or production method, to improving the methods you already have in place. Canadian farmers are always searching for ways to work better and smarter.
Nova Scotia’s reputation as a wine-growing region continues to flourish with award-winning labels and expanding production. In 2018, the province’s 23 licensed wineries produced 1.5 million litres of wine valued at over $23 million, employing over 700 people.
The Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) has calculated that by Feb. 9, 2019, a Canadian household of average income will have earned enough to pay their entire year's grocery bill.
Several years ago, June Matthews, an associate professor in the School of Food & Nutritional Sciences at Brescia University College in London, Ont., started to realize that something was missing from their otherwise comprehensive curricula: evidence-based information about agriculture.
For 14 years Chris Van de Laar has spent his time climbing the corporate ladder and developing a love affair with banking and finance. While an account manager with Scotiabank at rural Ontario branches in Listowel and Goderich, he handled a number of agriculture accounts, until moving into faster-paced commercial banking, and finally, he was offered a vice-president position.
Selling directly to consumers is a strong trend in farming these days, and it’s no wonder why. More profit is kept by the farmer and demand for local food is higher than ever. Consumers also want to get to know, if they can, who produces their food.   
When he was 12 years old, Owen Bridge had an encounter that would change his life. He met Dan Jason, the writer, activist and seed guru behind Salt Spring Seeds in B.C. Dan placed seeds from three rare bean varieties in Owen's hand, and assigned him a very special job: Growing and caring for them so they wouldn't disappear.
Canada currently imports millions of dollars’ worth of seed every year, despite mild winters in the southwest of B.C. that position the province as a viable climate for seed production.
Longtime horticultural labour issues advisor Ken Linington is the winner of this year’s Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers’ Association (OFVGA) Industry Award of Merit.
It's a few months before bloom, but not too soon to be thinking about your chemical thinning strategies for 2019. There are some new products being researched that will hopefully become available to Canadian apples producers in the next few years.
Fruit tree growers are often dealt major setbacks when warm temperatures arrive early in the spring and crops blossom early, leaving them susceptible to frost events.
Supply-side factors will drive the profitability stories for cranberries, blueberries and maple syrup, the three Canadian horticulture sectors Farm Credit Canada (FCC) focus on in 2019. FCC expects Canadian cranberry profitability to be near break-even in 2019. Policy changes in the U.S. are expected to help support producer prices and improve the sector’s outlook from 2018.
To boost both production and quality, some Canadian producers have been using high tunnels in conjunction with container production and a soilless growth medium.
Production of day neutral strawberries in Ontario is increasing as part of the berry industry’s efforts to extend the growing season. However, these ever-bearing berries have different disease management needs than the traditional June-bearing strawberries.
New crop profiles for cherry and grape are available free to download from the Government of Canada Publications web site or through the Crop profiles webpage.
Both stem and bulb nematode and leek moth are pests that are being watched closely by garlic and onion growers in Canada. Both pests have the potential to greatly impact garlic harvest, especially in Ontario.
A new processing plant in Guelph, Ont., plans to transmute sweet corn into a highly innovative product that can be used in a myriad of cutting-edge applications.
Bull’s Blood and Chioggia beets, Bright Lights Swiss chard, Kentucky Wonder pole beans, these vegetables, along with thousands of other open-pollinated varieties, were common place in Canada long before my mother planted her first garden. Who knew they would be coveted as precious heirlooms by her grandchildren’s generation?
Canada’s food processing sectors continue to expand, yet the profitability outlook for each is uneven in 2019. Production challenges, trade uncertainty and higher input costs generally dampen this outlook, while expansion in export markets, strong household disposable income and a lower Canadian dollar will support revenues of food manufacturers.
Download the 2019 New Varieties Resource
If I had to choose one tool to assist with integrated pest management in sweet corn, it would be the corn earworm trap.

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