Fruit & Vegetable Magazine

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IPM program developed for managing fungal diseases of carrot


March 17, 2008
By Fruit & Vegetable

Topics

Researchers in New York State have
developed an integrated pest management (IPM) program for managing
fungal diseases of carrot. The work was recently highlighted in the
January 2007 issue of Plant Disease, a publication of the American
Phytopathological Society.

Researchers in New York State have developed an integrated pest management (IPM) program for managing fungal diseases of carrot. The work was recently highlighted in the January 2007 issue of Plant Disease, a publication of the American Phytopathological Society. The goal of the study was to develop an effective management program for carrot fungal leaf blight diseases and to implement the program on an as-needed basis. New York growers can spray fungicides up to eight times a season on a regular spray schedule to manage Cercospora carotae and Alternaria dauci. The researchers found that a 25 per cent disease incidence threshold was appropriate for deciding when to spray the first fungicide. They also found that growing carrot plants in fields with a minimum two-year rotation out of carrot delayed the date the first fungicide spray was applied, as did planting less-susceptible cultivars. The less-susceptible cultivars also required fewer fungicide sprays during the season and were less severely diseased. Researchers stressed that regular field scouting and weather forecast monitoring was required to effectively identify conditions favourable to the pathogen. “Utilizing a 25 per cent disease incidence threshold as well as planting less-susceptible cultivars and rotating out of carrot for a minimum of two years will reduce fungicide use, improve fungal leaf blight disease management, and reduce production costs,” the report states.

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