Fruit & Vegetable Magazine

Features Production Research
B.C. Innovation Council provides awards

September 22, 2009  ByMarg Land


September 22, 2009,
Vancouver, BC – The B.C. Innovation Council (BCIC) recently announced the
recipients of the BCIC Commercialization of Agricultural Technology (CAT)
Competition.



September 22, 2009,
Vancouver, BC – The B.C. Innovation Council (BCIC) recently announced the
recipients of the BCIC Commercialization of Agricultural Technology (CAT)
Competition.

The recipients were
awarded $10,000 each to put towards developing business plans for the next
round of competition. Out of 60 applicants to this competition, 22 companies
were successful in moving forward to the proof of concept stage.

Advertisement

The winning companies are
involved in a diverse range of advanced science and technology innovations in
the agriculture, food and bioproducts sectors. Top applicants will be required
to make a presentation to a panel of expert judges for a chance to win a
portion of the $600,000 proof of concept money.

  • Several companies involved
    in horticulture have advanced to the next round of the competition. These
    include:
  • AgriForest Biotech Ltd.'s
    main objective is to establish a photoautrotrophic micro-propagation facility
    with optimized environmental and in-vitro conditions for the large-scale
    production of several new commercially important plant varieties for the
    agriculture and horticulture industries. The commercial application of this
    technology can produce hundred of thousand of clones of new plant varieties within
    a year at a significantly lower cost than conventional tissue culture
    micro-propagation.
  • EnWave Corporation's
    signature Radiant Energy Vacuum (REV) microwave technology has been
    incorporated into nutraREVTM, which is designed for use in the food industry to
    replace freeze drying for the dehydration of fruits, vegetables, herbs,
    seafood, meats and low-fat snack foods. This technology dehydrates foods more
    quickly and less expensively than conventional methods of dehydration. EnWave
    intends to build a new version of this technology which suites the production
    requirements of small and medium sized food processing companies.
  • Fresh Concept Canada Ltd.
    would like to apply technological advances in controlled atmosphere storage
    containers to ocean freight transportation of B.C. blueberries. By storing and
    transporting fruit crops under different atmospheric and temperature regimes,
    the shelf life and time to market can be extended with minimal adverse effects
    on taste or marketability. The ability to extend shelf life and to transport
    crops during this period opens new market opportunities for B.C. growers.
  • Innovative Food Systems
    intends to provide a complete novel system for the sanitation, preservation,
    and maintenance of food products that will be ripe, ready-to-eat, and in a food
    safe configuration. The sanitation technologies will be synergistic to the
    developing modified atmosphere box and lid technologies recently patented. The
    production processes of the greenhouse, orchard and field crop industries will
    be enhanced to provide sanitized fresh produce.
  • L.W. Truscott Farms
    intends to utilize culled fruit waste and other natural healthy ingredients to
    create food products that are a source of anthocyanins and anti-oxidants as
    well as other market value-added products. Twenty per cent of their own crop is
    currently being thrown away as culls and useable fruit. The utilization of
    culled fruit would reduce waste, create jobs in Creston, B.C., and provide
    financial stability.
  • Mountain View Wasabi Inc.
    has developed a method of using plant tissue culture technology to produce
    large numbers of disease-free wasabi plants in a short amount of time. Their
    objective is to commercialize wasabi plants to growers so they can establish
    their field or greenhouse productions by supplying year-round disease-free
    transplants that do not require heavy pesticides applications to compromise
    environmental sustainability.
  • Paramount Agri-support
    intends to convert biomass into charcoal (biochar) by burning it under oxygen
    free conditions to incorporate into a growth medium where it will improve water
    and nutrient retention, and promote the growth of beneficial soil microflora.
    They intend to use biochar and various microbes to design a series of novel
    products that will be targeted towards greenhouse growers or residential
    markets that service turf and home gardens.
  • Researchers at the
    University of British Columbia – Okanagan will be introducing new
    drought-tolerant rootstock genotypes to the wine industry and providing a novel
    molecular-level portable kit for early drought stress detection. With these
    innovations both water use efficiency and irrigation management practices will
    be improved with respect to both the timing and quantity of water used for
    grapevine berry production for wine making in British Columbia.
  • West Coast Aquaponics’
    technology exploits the symbiotic relationship between fish and plants in a
    closed system to produce a high value protein, and high quality vegetables or
    herbs close to or within urban areas. The system will consume less water than
    traditional aquaculture systems and methods of growing vegetables or herbs in
    soil, and will also be pesticide, hormone and chemical free.

 

 

 

 


Print this page

Advertisement

Stories continue below